Monday, April 24, 2017

Monday, April 10, 2017

Sunday, April 9, 2017

4/6/17 - The Talk Nobody Want's to Hear, Part One

http://prairiezen.org/Class_audio.html

http://prairiezen.org/Podcast/Class/rss.xml

"High Stakes as the Dalai Lama Hints at Being ‘Reborn’ Outside China. Beijing wants to pick the next Tibetan spiritual leader, but the Dalai Lama’s visit to a monastery town in India suggests that he has other plans."

The above quote is from a headline in the Wall Street Journal (link below though with only limited access to full article).

https://www.wsj.com/articles/high-stakes-as-the-dalai-lama-hints-at-being-reborn-outside-china-1491585210

Following is a summation of an article in the NY Times concerning this matter:

"The Dalai Lama has been enigmatic about how his successor will be chosen.

In the past, monks have turned to visions and oracles to lead them to a child conceived just as the previous Dalai Lama died. Having identified a child, they administer tests seeking to confirm that he is the reincarnated lama, such as asking him to pick out objects belonging to his predecessor.

But that method would leave Tibetan Buddhism without a leader for at least a year, allowing China to identify and promote its own candidate. The Dalai Lama has hinted that he may instead opt for a nontraditional selection process, selecting a child or an adult to succeed him while he is still alive.

Aging Tibetan Buddhist lamas have, in some cases, visited places where they would later be reincarnated as babies, and the Dalai Lama’s visits to Tawang and Mongolia seemed to fall into that pattern, said Robert J. Barnett, a historian of modern Tibet at Columbia University.

“This is a way of getting under the skin of the Chinese, of probing them, and reminding them that they have no control over where the next reincarnation occurs,” he said.

As the Dalai Lama’s arrival in Tawang grew closer this week, Chinese statements grew increasingly bellicose, .....

...Though India is typically wary of provoking China, several officials have been unusually pugnacious in their responses. Pema Khandu, the chief minister of Arunachal Pradesh, took the unusual step this week of stating that an independent Tibet, not China, is India’s true northern neighbor.

“Let me get this straight,” Mr. Khandu told journalists. “China has no business telling us what to do and what not to do because it is not our next-door neighbor.”

The Dalai Lama, for his part, has been characteristically jovial to the crowd of journalists trailing after him, expounding cheerily on subjects from quantum physics to global warming. He hardly needs to do more, Mr. Barnett said.

“He doesn’t have to do anything except exist and be his usual beaming self to embarrass the Chinese,” he said. “He will be right on the border, he will be a complete free person, he will be only meters away from Chinese territory, but they cannot do anything about it.”


An interesting development in the ongoing Chinese attempt to control the future of Tibetan Buddhism. And a non-violent approach to a major international issue and conflict. 

Does this hold out hope for actual conflict resolution? Will the Chinese be willing to seriously negotiate with the Tibetans?

What can we learn from this?